Tiltfactor | Dartmouth’s Tiltfactor Launches Games to Improve Access to Biodiversity Heritage Library Content
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Dartmouth’s Tiltfactor Launches Games to Improve Access to Biodiversity Heritage Library Content

3 Comments
  • Patty Johnson
    Posted at 20:36h, 09 August

    Hello. I am enjoying the Beanstalk game and will likely remain engaged in it for the next few weeks or more. I am wondering…

    Can words with little independent meaning/context somehow be eliminated – words like a, and, the, of. Fewer encounters with the meaningless “language” words would make the process more interesting.

    One other suggestion: On a desktop monitor the game plays great. On my smaller laptop at home the type and especially the punctuation becomes difficult to read, requiring lots of squinting. Is there a way to enlarge the type altogether or insert an enlarge typeface option?

    Thank you. I am a regular contributor to and user of the Biodiversity Heritage Site and realize the impact this game could potentially provide to those using the site for research.

    • Max Seidman
      Posted at 13:38h, 10 August

      Hi Patty!

      First off, thanks for playing the game and thanks for your comment. On to your questions:

      1. Unfortunately we can’t eliminate non-content words, because the software that feeds words into the game can’t tell the difference between important, meaningful words and meaningless words. Fortunately, after ANY word has been typed enough, it is removed from the games, so you won’t be seeing the same “the” over and over again. Even if we could choose to not have words like ‘a’ and ‘the’ appear in the game, we might want to keep them anyway. Although the “meaningful” words are more important for researchers, non-content words can still be important to transcribe for various reasons, including text-to-speech for the visually impaired.

      2. Could you tell me a little more about the size of the words? Do you find that they’re all too small on a small screen, or just some of them?

      Keep it up (at this moment you’re number 2 on the high scores list!),

      Max

  • Patty Johnson
    Posted at 12:45h, 18 August

    Hi Max,
    Thanks for your response! I hadn’t thought about the necessity of “stop words” for voice recognition.
    The text size is too small roughly 20-25% of the time on my laptop. I sometimes take a stab at the words anyway and sometimes hit the pass button. Most of the time I mistake a period for a coma or vice versa.
    Cheers,

    Patty