tiltfactor » RESEARCH

Research Projects

Tiltfactor instigates, provokes, and inspires change. Our lab is home to many research projects which creatively disrupt the norm by using an approach we call “critical play.” Our mission is to research and develop software, events, experiences, and artifacts that create rewarding, compelling interactions. In most of our works, we invite public participation. Often, these situations involve play and games. With a multidimensional focus on inventive game design for social change, human values in the design process, and sustainability, our team seeks to create imaginative interventions for critical thinking and social change. Our ultimate goals are to bring dialogue and action to the forefront and to help people explore what is possible for themselves and their communities. (See our list of publications)

image

Understanding Bias

Tiltfactor develops games that explore challenging and complex social issues to understand how and when games can have impact. We design, build, and study novel games drawing on what psychologists have discovered about biases such as implicit bias, stereotype threat, prejudice, and confirmation bias in order to reduce poor decision making, limitations in education and careers, and more. One particular strand is our work on stereotype threat and implicit bias toward women in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Games include:

  • Awkward Moment, a party card game for middle school age kids and older; preliminary findings suggest that Awkward Moment strengthens associations between women and STEM and inspires greater assertiveness in confronting social bias.
  • Buffalo, a fast-paced party card game for adults and families; initial data suggests that buffalo reduces prejudice and encourages greater inclusiveness in players’ representations of social identity groups.

These games are part of the National Science Foundation-funded project, “Transforming STEM For Women and Girls: Reworking Stereotypes & Bias”, with additional assistance from the National Girls Collaborative Project. Publications include:

image

Metadata Games

We seek to understand the ways in which games, play, and social computing can work together to solve pressing societal needs. Metadata Games (MG) is a free and open source online game system for gathering useful data for digital archives. Our aims are to create fun and engaging online experiences for players while contributing to vital archival records, and offer opportunities for cultural heritage institutions and players to connect with one another in ways they may not have otherwise. With Metadata Games, we are investigating how player motivation, game design, crowdsourcing, and natural language techniques can produce more –and higher quality– metadata for more accurate search and improve community engagement. We are working with partners at the Boston Public Library, the Massachusetts Digital Commonwealth, and the Digital Public Library of America, among others.

One Up, a two-player asynchronous image tagging game for mobile devices. This is a multi-round game where you score points for submitting single-word tags and try to get more points than your opponent. One Up is designed to foster higher quality tag submissions; a more detailed explanation of the methodology and preliminary test results was published as part of the 2013 Digital Games Research Associations (DiGRA) Proceedings.

  • Zen Tag, a single player game where one inputs, at their own pace, words and phrases that describe the image before them.
  • Pyramid Tag, a timed single player mobile game where players try to describe an image and match as many words as possible with a group of experts.
  • NexTag, a minimalized version of Zen Tag, Nex Tag offers players the ability to tag audio and moving image media.

These games are designed to be played online and also on mobile devices.

games for health

Health

Our health games advance better understanding of community health issues. We investigate how design, quality, psychology, and innovation in games can result in better health communities and health outcomes. Our games aim to promote self-care, immunization and disease prevention, HIV/AIDS education, health care systems understanding, mental health, and more. We have worked with The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, The Dartmouth Center for Health Care Delivery Science, the Minister of Health of Rwanda, and the Rippel Foundation. A sample of our games for health work includes:

  • POX: SAVE THE PEOPLE, a board game and iPad app that helps players understand the concept of herd immunity through vaccination.
  • Microbes, a card game developed for the Minister of Health of Rwanda to improve rates of handwashing among youth both at home and abroad.
  • RePlay Health, a freely-downloadable role-playing sport that models the American health care system and allows players to change the system (developed with The Dartmouth Center for Health Care Delivery Science and the Rippel Foundation).
  • In The Village, a card game that teaches self sacrificial sharing in the prevention of malaria.
  • Pathways for Quality, a card game to help communities organize as part of The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Aligning Forces for Quality effort.

Publications include:

Publications

Tiltfactor makes games, but we also study and theorize about them. We publish our thinking in scientific journals, books, humanities journals and proceedings, education conferences, and more.

2013
Kaufman, Geoff and Flanagan, M. “Lost in Translation: Comparing the Impact of an Analog and Digital Version of a Public Health Game on Players’ Perceptions, Attitudes, and Cognitions.” International Journal of Games and Computer Mediated Simulations 5(3) 2013, 1-9.

As growing body of work demonstrates the ability of games to significantly transform cognitive skill sets and attitudes toward social issues, including public health, it becomes increasingly imperative to understand the divergent outcomes afforded by analog and digital game platforms. Here, authors learn that a nearly identical, digital version of an analog public health game has shown to be less effective at facilitating learning and attitude change. Several explanations based on psychological theories are discussed.

Flanagan, M., Punjasthitkul, S., Seidman, M., Kaufman, G. and Carini, P. “Citizen Archivists at Play: Game Design for Gathering Metadata for Cultural Heritage Institutions.” Proceedings of DiGRA 2013, Atlanta, Georgia, August 2013.

This overview of the Metadata Games project explains the potential role of games in collecting valuable information about archival media through crowdsourcing. Challenges are discussed, including maximizing the player audience, ensuring high replayability, and verifying the accuracy of publicly generated data. The authors ultimately present the “Outlier Design” model used to identify and address these challenges.

2012
Flanagan, M. & Carini, P. (2012). “How games can help us access and understand cultural artifacts.” American Archivist 75(2), pp 514-537.

As libraries and archives seek to digitize millions of items, institutions struggle to collect quality, relevant metadata–the informative tags regarding an item’s content, context, and creation. Reporting on a pilot study of Metadata Games, this paper elaborates on the utility games in collecting metadata, and the potential connection fostered between such rich archival data and a diverse user base which includes researchers, hobbyists, and of course, gamers!

Kaufman, G. and Libby, L. Changing Beliefs and Behavior Through Experience-Taking Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, March 26, 2012.

The present research introduces the concept of experience-taking, in which individuals’ spontaneously orient themselves around the identity of a character within a narrative, simulating the emotions, behaviors, goals, and traits of the character as if they were one’s own.The six studies detailed here investigated the conditions under which this imaginative process occurs while reading a brief fictional work, with special attention to self-concept accessibility, first vs. third-person narrative voice, and ingroup-outgroup membership. Implications for behavior are discussed.

2011
Flanagan, M., Seidman, M., Belman, J., Punjasthitkul, S., Downs, Z., Ayoob, M., Driscoll, A., and Downs, M. Preventing a POX Among the People? A Design Case Study of a Public Health Game Proceedings of DiGRA 2011 Conference: Think Design Play, Hilversum, Netherlands. 

POX: SAVE THE PEOPLE is a board game challenging players to stop the spread of a deadly disease. This article details the design process of a public health game, seeking to understand the ways in which science knowledge can be embedded in the game, and transferred from a board to its players.

Belman, J., Nissenbaum, H., Flanagan, M., and Diamond, J. Grow-A-Game: A Tool for Values Conscious Design and Analysis of Digital Games Proceedings of DiGRA 2011 Conference: Think Design Play, Hilversum, Netherlands.

Developed by the Values at Play (VAP) project, the Grow-A-Game cards facilitate values-conscious design and analysis of digital games. In this report, we follow the Grow-A-Game cards as they are implemented in a series of beginner and advanced game design courses, where they are used to better understand the relationship between values and games, as well as to produce innovating and interesting values-focused designs.

2010
Belman, J. and Flanagan, M. Exploring the Creative Potential of Values Conscious Design: Students’ Experiences with the VAP Curriculum. Eludamos: Journal for Computer Game Culture

The goals of Values at Play (VAP) is to investigate the role of social, moral, and political values in digital games, and to develop a systematic apporach to integrating human values in the design process. Authors provide an overview of the curricula and materials created to date, disucssing their use in graduate and undergraduate game design courses.

Belman, J. and Flanagan, M. Designing Games to Foster Empathy. Cognitive Technology, 14(2).

Research converges on the idea that games are well-suited for fostering empathy in players and groups. The authors begin with an overview of psychology research on empathy, followed by a set of heuristic principles derived from the literature which have direct and practical applications for the design of games for the social good. Lastly, the authors visit three games–PeaceMaker, Hush, and Layoff–as examples of games which have incorporated these approaches into their design.

2009
Belman, J., Flanagan M., and Nissenbaum, H. Instructional Methods and Curricula for Values Conscious Design. Loading: The Official Journal of the Canadian Games Studies Association, 3(4).

Values at Play seeks to investigate the role of social, moral, and political values in digital games. Goals of this project include developing approaches to considering values in the design process, as well as creating and disseminating curricula and instructional materials for introducing students to “values conscious” design. Here, authors provide an overview of curricula and instructional materials as implemented in graduate and undergraduate game design courses.

Flanagan, M. and Lotko, A. Anxiety, Openness, and Activist Games: A Case Study for Critical Play. Proceedings of the Digital Games Research Association, Uxbridge UK, 2009.

A case study of a popular activist game demonstrates how the most powerful play experience results from a new relationship formed between the audience and the player, with special attention to the game’s mechanics, subject position, representation, and content.

2008
Flanagan, M. and Nissenbaum, H. Design Heuristics for Activist Games. Beyond Barbie to Mortal Kombat. C. Heeter and Y. Kafai (eds). Cambridge: MIT Press 2008.

Games have come to be integral to human culture. Given contemporary understanding that human principles could be embedded in game design, the authors offer a values-conscious approach to design, opening opportunities for socially conscious gameplay and design.

Flanagan, M., Howe, D., and Nissenbaum, H. Values in Design: Theory and Practice” (pdf) In Information Technology and Moral Philosophy, Jeroen van den Hoven and John Weckert (eds.) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008.

In a spectrum of approaches to the study of technology and society, it has been understood that values come to be embodied in technical systems and devices. The authors of this paper offer a more holistic approach to design, in which values are equally as relevant to design as functionality. As a more general goal, the authors hope to foster a world where our technology reflects our social, political, and moral values.

2007
Flanagan, M. The Sims: Suburban Utopias Borries, Friedrich von, Walz, Steffen P., Böttger, Matthias (eds.) Space Time Play. Synergies Between Computer Games, Architecture and Urbanism, Birkhäuser Publishing, Basel Boston Berlin, 2007.

Plass, J. L, Goldman, R., Flanagan, M., Diamond, J., Dong, C., Looui, S., Hyuksoon Song, H., Rosalia, C., and Perlin, K. RAPUNSEL: How a computer game designed based on educational theory can improve girls’ self-efficacy and self-esteem.Proceedings of the American Educational Research Association, Chicago, April 2007.

The authors review a three-year project to design a web-based software environment for real-time, applied programming for underrepresented students’ early literacy (RAPUNSEL), the chief goal of which, was to design an interactive way to teach middle school girls computer programming. Accomplished through the computer game environment called Peeps, students used programming as a means to achieve goals relevant to other players. By facilitating safe ways to learn-by-error, students’ experienced increases in self-efficacy, self-esteem, computer self-efficacy, and programming self-efficacy. Implications for educators and designers are discussed.

Flanagan, M. Locating Play and Politics: Real World Games and Political Action. Proceedings of the Digital Arts and Culture Conference, Perth Australia, Dec 2007.

The author explores the potential of locative media to act as a tool for empowerment, community building, and cultural change, by offering a conception of the urban environment as a site of novel play experiences. New technologies and mobile platforms contribute to the city’s playscape, and further inform the ways in which creative projects will continue to engage the city itself as the environment for play. Implications for this form of play are discussed, and the social and political possibilities of taking play to the streets are explored.

Flanagan, M., Nissenbaum, H., Diamond, J., and Belman, J. A Method for Discovering Values in Digital Games.Full paper presented at Situated Play DiGRA ’07 (Tokyo, JP September 24-28, 2007).

The authors present a tool called “Values Cards,” which when used as part of the game-design process, prompt creators to consider how values are expressed through game mechanics and representational elements. Analyses of such concepts can be posted to a collective wiki and shared among designers interested in games from a values perspective.

Flanagan, M. and Nissenbaum, H. A Game Design Methodology to Incorporate Activist Themes.Proceedings of the CHI 2007 conference, 28 April – May 3, San Jose, California.Flanagan, M. and Nissenbaum, H. A Game Design Methodology to Incorporate Social Activist Themes.Proceedings of CHI 2007. New York, NY: ACM Press, 181 – 190.

The authors explore a variety of educational and activist game approaches, specifically projects involving design for young women. Offering a close look at Values at Play (VAP), the authors show how a values-based methodology that could be implemented in the creation of games as well as the teaching of game design.

Flanagan, M. and Looui, S. Rethinking the F Word: A Review of Activist Art on the Internet. National Women’s Studies Association Journal (Special Issue: Feminist Activist Art) 19:1, Spring 2007, 181-200.

New technologies have a variety of potential applications for feminist activism. Here, the authors explore emerging directions of feminist art in relation to the internet, considering how technology has informed and realized the goals of feminist artists and activists. Challenges and possibilities of new media, feminist art are discussed.

Feminist Art Activist Roundtable National Women’s Studies Association Journal (Special Issue: Feminist Activist Art) 19:1, Spring 2007.

This special issue presents a roundtable with contemporary feminist, activist, designers and artists. Creators discuss trends toward tactical intervention for the social good, and implications for art and design in altering the social and cultural landscape.

2006
Flanagan, M. My Profile, Myself in Playculture. Exploring Digital Artefacts . Johan Bornebusch and Patrik Hernwall, Editors. M3 Publication, 2006, 20-29.

Flanagan, M.Making Games for Social Change. AI & Society: The Journal of Human-Centered Systems. Springer London: Springer, 20:1, January 2006.Flanagan, M. The ‘Nature’ of Networks: Space and Place in the Silicon Forest. Nature et progrès : interactions, exclusions, mutations. Ed. Pierre Lagayette. Paris : Presses de l’Université. Paris-Sorbonne, 2006.

2005
Flanagan, M., Howe, D. C., and Nissenbaum, H. New Design Methods for Activist Gaming Proceedings from DiGRA 2005, 16-20 June, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Designers and engineers are becoming increasingly aware of the ways in which political, social and ethical values come to be embodied in the artifacts they create. Here, the authors introduce systematic methods for the discovery, analysis, and integration of values into the work of game designers and technologists, discussing the benefits and challenges of a values-oriented approach as it applies to a variety of design contexts.

Flanagan, M. Troubling ‘Games for Girls’: Notes from the Edge of Game Design. Proceedings from DiGRA 2005, 16-20 June, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

The author presents notes from a project to design an activist, multiplayer game for middle-school girls, providing diverse feedback on RAPUNSEL. This paper challenges the many gender-based stereotypes that are inherent in computing culture, and further discusses how a designer may allow for multiple play styles.

Flanagan, M., Howe, D.C., and Nissenbaum, H. Values at Play: Design Tradeoffs in Socially-Oriented Game Design Proceedings of the CHI 2005 conference on Human factors in computing systems. CHI 2005, 2-7 April, Portland, Oregon. New York: ACM Press.

As designers and engineers come to understand the ways in which political, social and cultural values come to be embedded in games, many struggle to find balance between their own values and those of users, stakeholders, and those of the surrounding culture. Authors present the RAPUNSEL project as a case study of game design in a values-rich context, and describe efforts navigating among value sets.

2004
Flanagan, M. Developing Virtual Performance Spaces. American Puppetry. Ed. Phyllis T. Dircks. New York: Theatre Library Association, 2004.
2003
Flanagan, M. Une Maison de Poupee Virtuelle Capitaliste? The Sims: Domesticite, Consommation, et Feminite. Consommations & Sociétés: Cahiers pluridisciplinaire sur la consommation et l’interculturel. Ed. Mélanie Roustan et Dominique Desjeux.

Flanagan, M. the bride stripped bare to her Data: information flow and digibodies. in Data Made Flesh, Thurtle et al. 2003.

The author offers an overview of digital information representation, focusing on the embodied code of virtual characters. The world’s first virutal newscaster, Ananova, a character-based, live-information interface, Motorola’s Mya data service, and Syndi, a “celebrity portal” search engine that purports a subjective experience through a character are followed as exemplars. The author discusses the role of the female in these representations, as well as the ramifications of data embodiment, particularly as it pertains to information conveyed through female-shaped bodies.

Flanagan, M. Next Level: Women’s Digital Activism through Gaming. Digital Media Revisited. Edited by Andrew Morrison, Gunnar Liestøl & Terje Rasmussen. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2003, 359 – 388.

The author explores noncommercial computer games created by women in order to explore the ways in which language and conventions of gaming culture are shaped and reshaped by women artist activists. Focusing on the works of Natalie Bookchin, Pamela Jennings, and Lucia Grossberger-Morales, the author discusses motivations, themes, and impacts of feminist gaming practices in culture and cyberfeminism.

Flanagan, M. Response to Celia Pearce: About Computer Gaming. First Person. Ed. Noah Wardrip-Fruin and Pat Harrigan. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2003.

2002
Flanagan, M. Hyperbodies, Hyperknowledge: Women in Games, Women in Cyberpunk, and Strategies of Resistance. reload: rethinking women + cyberculture . Cambridge: MIT Press, 2002, 425-454.

While there are more female protagonists in popular computer games than in cinema, they are prone to rigid styles of representation based largely on men’s fantasies. Here, the author presents digital art projects that challenge assumptions about the body and knowledge, gender, and technology, in an effort to articulate the formation and workings of knowledge for women within technoculture.

2001
Spatialized MagnoMemories. Culture Machine 3 – Virologies: Culture and Contamination. Eds. David Boothroyd and Gary Hall. 2001.
2000
Flanagan, M. navigable narratives: gender +narrative spatiality in virtual worlds. Art Journal. 59:3, Fall 2000, 74 – 85.

Technology affords space for unique means of storytelling and identity formation. This paper seeks to understand the construction of virtual bodies and space by examining the ways in which concepts of gender are embedded in the construction of online worlds. The author discusses the implications of performing the digital space, with regard to the political specificity of virtual reality.

1999
Flanagan, M. Mobile Identities, Digital Stars, & Post-Cinematic Selves. Wide Angle: Issue on Digitality & the Memory of Cinema. 21:3, 1999.

The author discusses the emergence of female, digital stars as they relate to those of contemporary film. Presenting comparison between digital stars and stars of film history, the author complicates the “man-made” female form, as well as highlights the subject/object positions examined by feminist scholars of popular media.

Flanagan, M. Digital Stars Are Here to Stay. convergence: the journal of research into new media technologies. Eds. Julia Knight + Alexis Weedon, University of Luton.

The author makes the case for digital stars of gaming by showing how such characters engage each individuals’ unique sense of agency, and how players engage intimate relationships with the avatars they control.

Flanagan, M. Mobile Identities, Digital Stars, & Post-Cinematic Selves. Wide Angle: Issue on Digitality & the Memory of Cinema. 21:3, 1999.

  • Tiltfactor invents new ways of thinking about important social issues through engaging games and play. Founded and directed by leading innovator Dr. Mary Flanagan, Tiltfactor is the award-winning design studio and research laboratory that takes on problem areas of national need and creates solutions through playful design.